Translating Molecular Bacterial Load Assay
to Policy and Practice

An International Conference
11-13 June 2018 . School of Medicine University of St Andrews

MBLA implementation

implemented

upcoming

PHE Porton Down, England

PHE Porton Down, Salisbury, England

PHE Porton Down, England

Manor Farm Rd, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG, UK

Raboud University, Netherlands

Raboud University Nijmegen, University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Raboud University, Netherlands

Comeniuslaan 4, 6525 HP Nijmegen, Netherlands

University of St Andrews, Scotland

School of Medicine, University of St Andrews, Scotland

University of St Andrews, Scotland

St Andrews KY16 9TF, UK

Shoklo Malaria Research Unit, Thailand

Shoklo Malaria Research Unit, Thailand

Shoklo Malaria Research Unit, Thailand

Mae Sot, Mae Sot District, Tak 63110, Thailand

Oxford University Clinical Research Centre, Vietnam

Oxford University Clinical Research Centre, Ho Chi Mine Hanoi University of Pharmacy, Ha Noi, Vietnam

Oxford University Clinical Research Centre, Vietnam

13-15 Lê Thánh Tông, Phan Chu Trinh, Hoàn Kiếm, Hà Nội, Vietnam

Maputo National TB Reference Lab, Mozambique

Maputo National TB Reference Lab, Mozambique

Maputo National TB Reference Lab, Mozambique

Maputo, Mozambique

Tanzania

Kilimanjaro Clinical Research Institute, Tanzania

Kibongo’to Infectious Diseases Hospital, Tanzania

NIMR-Mbeya Medical Research Centre, Tanzania

Tanzania

Moshi Urban, Tanzania

College of Medicine University of Malawi, Malawi

College of Medicine University of Malawi, Malawi

College of Medicine University of Malawi, Malawi

P.O. Box 280 Chancellor College, Zomba, Malawi

University of Cape Town, South Africa

University of Cape Town, South Africa

University of Cape Town, South Africa

Rondebosch, Cape Town, 7700, South Africa

Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Stellenbosch Central, Stellenbosch, 7599, South Africa

National TB Reference Laboratory, Moldova

National TB Reference Laboratory, Moldova

National TB Reference Laboratory, Moldova

Moldova

University of Singapore, Singapore

University of Singapore, Singapore

University of Singapore, Singapore

21 Lower Kent Ridge Rd, Singapore 119077

Makerere University, Uganda

Makerere University, Uganda

Makerere University, Uganda

Kampala, Uganda

Lambarene Medical Research Centre, Gabone

Lambarene Medical Research Centre, Gabone

Lambarene Medical Research Centre, Gabone

Gaborone, Botswana

Bagamoyo, Tanzania

Bagamoyo, Tanzania

Bagamoyo, Tanzania

Bagamoyo, Tanzania

The Molecular Bacterial Load Assay (MBLA) stakeholders conference is technology transfer conference. The conference will bring together users and potential users of MBLA and policymakers from across the globe, and representatives from World Health Organisation.

MBLA is a novel tool developed to foster rapid detection and monitoring tuberculosis treatment response in real-time for timely clinical decisions.  Tuberculosis is currently the leading infectious disease that kills more people in the world. The need for an effective tool for management of the disease have never been more urgent.

This conference, scheduled for 11-13th June 2018 at University of St Andrews will provide a platform for users and policy makers to share their field experience working with the test, and advise how it can best be taken up into clinical practice.

Please email mblaweek@st-andrews.ac.uk for more information about the conference.

What is MBLA?

MBLA stands for the molecular bacterial load assay.   Bacterial culture, the main method used to assess the performance of treatment regimens and laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is very slow.  By the time the results are available it is many weeks after the patient has visited the doctor and the result is of much less value.  TB culture requires high biosafety containment facilities and staff training, the cost of which is a significant barrier to implementation in most low and middle-income countries (LMIC) with a high TB burden.

The Molecular bacterial load assay (MBLA) was developed and has been progressively developed since then.  It works by amplifying the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of M. tuberculosis in a PCR reaction which takes less than four hours. This target was chosen because it is stable, occurs in higher quantities and reflects cell viability.  It is specific to M. tuberculosisand the result is not compromised by all of the other organisms that are found in patient samples.

Thus, the MBLA can be used to diagnose tuberculosis, quantify the number of live organisms rapidly and because of this it can tell whether a patient is responding to treatment rapidly.