The Bird that was Trapped has Flown

The Bird that was Trapped has Flown

This poem is part of the Poems for doctors project. You can find out more about the project here.

Season 2 : poem 2

Medical Lecturer Veronica O’Carroll reads The Bird that was Trapped has Flown by James Robertson

The Bird that was Trapped has Flown

James Robertson

in memoriam Vicky Patterson

The bird that was trapped has flown
The sky that was grey is blue
The bone that was dead has grown
The dream that was dreamed is true
The locked door has been swung wide
The prisoner has been set free
The lips that were sealed have cried
The eye that was blind can see
The tree that was bare is green
The room that was dull is bright
The sheet that was soiled is clean
The dawn that was dark is light
The road that was blocked has no end
The unknown journey is known
The heart that is hurt will mend
The bird that was trapped has flown

Rights: by permission of the author

A moderated Facebook group hosts discussion for medics and others who would like to follow up on ideas arising from ‘Poems for Doctors’.

To ask to join, or add to the discussion if you are already a member, please visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/poemsfordoctors/

On Hearing for the First Time

On Hearing for the First Time

This poem is part of the Poems for doctors project. You can find out more about the project here.

We’re very pleased to start our second season of medics reading poems from Scottish Poetry Library’s anthology ‘Tools of the Trade: Poems for New Doctors’. We hope you enjoy the readings, your thoughts and comments are welcome.

Season 2 : poem 1

Medical Demonstrator Linda Proven reads On Hearing for the First Time by Carole Bromley

On Hearing for the First Time

Carole Bromley

‘It sounds very very high’

and she sobs for the joy of it,
for the reds and blues of it,
the shock, the hullabaloo,

the kerfuffle, the Sturm und Drang,
the sudden ice cream in a shake,
the sherbet firework burst.

‘It’s just amazing’ she cries
her face in her hands.
‘I’m going to say the months of the year’

and she hears them, shaking,
‘January February March’
April overwhelms her.

lt’s like never having seen a bird,
or the sea or the stars
never tasting an orange,

like living all your life in a cave
and coming out into the light,
the sun on your face.

Afterwards she walks by the Tyne,
daren’t go alone for fear
the birdsong, the traffic, the ship’s hooter

will be too much. They are not.
It’s like falling in love.

Rights: by permission of the author

A moderated Facebook group hosts discussion for medics and others who would like to follow up on ideas arising from ‘Poems for Doctors’.

To ask to join, or add to the discussion if you are already a member, please visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/poemsfordoctors/

Poems for doctors – season 2 teaser trailer

Poems for doctors – season 2 teaser trailer

July 5th is the 70th anniversary of the foundation of the NHS. In celebration of all the good things that the NHS does for us, we’re going to be timing Season Two of Poems for doctors to finish on the anniversary itself.

Season Two will show eight new video readings of doctors reading poems about health, medicine, and experience from the Scottish Poetry Library’s ‘Tools of the trade’ anthology.  You can hear about why some of the poems were chosen in this teaser trailer.

There are some special moments to come – we hope they might make you pause for thought, perhaps sometimes shed a tear, and maybe occasionally break out a broad smile.

Please enjoy, and thanks for watching.

IMPORTANT NEWS ABOUT SEASON TWO of Poems for Doctors

IMPORTANT NEWS ABOUT SEASON TWO of Poems for Doctors

Season Two of Poems for Doctors is coming soon! Watch out for our teaser trailer very soon!

 
This time we are coordinating the season with a special event – the 70th Anniversary of the UK National Health Service. Readings in Season Two will lead up to July 5th when the NHS celebrates its 70th birthday.
 
We’re making a couple of changes and improvements this season. The Facebook Group will now be ‘open’ which means that anyone will be able to read content there. Comments will still be moderated by the steering group, and only group members will be able to make posts and comment. We will also allow comments on posts on our blog at http://med.st-andrews.ac.uk/poemsfordoctors/, again comments will be moderated by staff from the projects.
 
I’m adding closed captions to Season Two posts – these will be visible on Facebook when audio is off. On Vimeo you’ll be able to switch captions on and off using the CC button, so if you find them helpful, they’re there. Of course the full text of each poem read will still also be published along with the video on our blog.
Poems for doctors at STANZA 2018

Poems for doctors at STANZA 2018

We are excited to confirm that Poems for doctors will have a presence at the STANZA international poetry festival in St Andrews this week. The festival runs from March 7-11th.  Our projection kiosk will be playing a loop of all of our first season of poetry readings in the Byre Theatre.

Find out more at: http://stanzapoetry.org/festival/events/poems-doctors

A second kiosk will also be on display in the Medical and Biological Sciences building at the North Haugh.

A moderated Facebook group hosts discussion for medics and others who would like to follow up on ideas arising from ‘Poems for Doctors’.

To ask to join, or add to the discussion if you are already a member, please visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/poemsfordoctors/

Second Opinion

Second Opinion

This poem is part of the Poems for doctors project. You can find out more about the project here.

This is the last poem of our first season of readings. A second series of doctors and medical students reading Poems for doctors is currently in preparation. Series 2 will be available online later in March.

Season 1 : poem 7

Prof David Crossman, Dean of Medicine at the University of St Andrews, and Chief Scientist for Scotland, reads Second Opinion by Douglas Dunn.

Second Opinion

Douglas Dunn

We went to Leeds for a second opinion.
After her name was called,
I waited among the apparently well
And those with bandaged eyes and dark spectacles.

A heavy mother shuffled with bad feet
And a stick, a pad over one eye,
Leaving her children warned in their seats.
The minutes went by like a winter.

They called me in. What moment worse
Than that young doctor trying to explain?
‘It’s large and growing.’ ‘What is?’ ‘Malignancy.’
‘Why there? She’s an artist!’

He shrugged and said, ‘Nobody knows.’
He warned me it might spread. ‘Spread?’
My body ached to suffer like her twin
And touch the cure with lips and healing sesames.

No image, no straw to support me – nothing
To hear or see. No leaves rustling in sunlight.
Only the mind sliding against events
And the antiseptic whiff of destiny.

Professional anxiety –
His hand on my shoulder
Showing me to the door, a scent of soap,
Medical fingers, and his wedding ring.

Rights: ‘Second Opinion’ from Elegies (Faber & Faber, 1985) by permission of the publisher

A moderated Facebook group hosts discussion for medics and others who would like to follow up on ideas arising from ‘Poems for Doctors’.

To ask to join, or add to the discussion if you are already a member, please visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/poemsfordoctors/

Poem for a Hospital Wall

Poem for a Hospital Wall

This poem is part of the Poems for doctors project. You can find out more about the project here.

Season 1 : poem 6

Love is in the air – Lecturer in Infectious Disease, Dr Winnie Dhaliwal reads Poem for a Hospital Wall by Diana Hendry

Poem for a Hospital Wall

Diana Hendry

Love has been loitering
down this corridor
has been seen
chatting up out-patients
spinning the wheels of wheelchairs
fluttering the pulse of the night nurse
appearing, disguised, as a bunch of grapes and a smile
hiding in dreams
handing out wings in orthopedics
adding a wee drappie
aphrodisiaccy
to every prescription.
No heart is ever by-passed by Love.

Love has been loitering down this corridor
is highly infectious
mind how you go. If you smile
you might catch it.

Rights: from Borderers (Peterloo Poets, 2001) Reproduced by permission of the author.

A moderated Facebook group hosts discussion for medics and others who would like to follow up on ideas arising from ‘Poems for Doctors’.

To ask to join, or add to the discussion if you are already a member, please visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/poemsfordoctors/

Nothing

Nothing

This poem is part of the Poems for doctors project. You can find out more about the project here.

Season 1 : poem 5

Deputy Head of the University of St Andrews School of Medicine Julie Struthers reads Nothing by Selima Hill

Nothing

Selima Hill

Because she is exhausted
and confused,

and doesn’t want to argue,
and can’t speak,

she dreams of nothing
for a thousand years,

or what the nurses cheerfully call
a week.

Rights: from Gloria: Selected Poems (Bloodaxe Books, 2008), reproduced with permission of Bloodaxe Books
www.bloodaxebooks.com

A moderated Facebook group hosts discussion for medics and others who would like to follow up on ideas arising from ‘Poems for Doctors’.

To ask to join, or add to the discussion if you are already a member, please visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/poemsfordoctors/

A brief format to be used when consulting with patients

A brief format to be used when consulting with patients

Happy New Year and very best wishes for 2018!

This poem is part of the Poems for doctors project. You can find out more about the project here.

Season 1 : poem 4

Junior Hospital Physician Dr Chris Lowe reads A brief format to be used when consulting with patients by Glenn Colquhoun

A brief format to be used when consulting with patients

Glenn Colquhoun

The patient will talk.

The doctor will talk.

The doctor will listen while
the patient is talking.

The patient will listen while
the doctor is talking.

The patient will think that the doctor
knows what the doctor is talking about.

The doctor will think that the patient
knows what the patient is talking about.

The patient will think that the doctor
knows what the patient is talking about.

The doctor will think that the patient
knows what the doctor is talking about.

The doctor will be sure.
The patient will be sure.

The patient will be sure.
The doctor will be sure.

Shouldn’t hurt a bit, should it?

————-

Find out more about this poem at the Scottish Poetry Library

Rights: A brief format to be usd when consulting with patients from Playing God: Poems about medicine (Steele Roberts, 2002) by permission of the author

A moderated Facebook group hosts discussion for medics and others who would like to follow up on ideas arising from ‘Poems for Doctors’.

To ask to join, or add to the discussion if you are already a member, please visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/poemsfordoctors/

Season 1

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