Longitude Prize

The Orbital Diagnostics team is in the running for the £8 million Longitude Prize for their SLIC device.  The scattered light integrated collector (SLIC) can detect minute amounts of bacteria in a urine sample and test which antibiotic it can be treated with in about half an hour.

Professor Gillespie recently spoke with The Telegraph about the device “We’ve gone into the hospital and tested it and we know it works,

what we’re hoping is that someone with no training can put the urine sample into the SLIC, will press a button and within half an hour they’ll know what antibiotic to treat the patient with,”.

The prize was due to be be awarded in September 2019 but has been put back to at least 2020 because of the stringent criteria set by the prize and because teams are starting from scratch, says Mr Berman of Nesta.

The full article can be found on The Telegraph’s website below:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/0/wiggle-ometer-latest-weapon-fight-against-superbugs/